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Alcohol Ink + Canned Air Effects

Combine Alcohol Inks and canned air to create amazing one-of-a-kind ink patterns.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

This month I have been sharing with you some of the incredible things you can do with Alcohol Inks.  Today I want to share a fun technique that uses the power of canned air to create some unique ink patterns.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Begin by dripping alcohol ink onto a non-porous surface.  For this example I am using Ranger’s Glossy Cardstock.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Begin blowing the ink with the canned air.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

As the air hits the ink, it will cause the ink to move in a burst pattern.  You can continue to blast the ink with air as long as it is wet.  Turn your cardstock as you blast the air to create lots of different directions in the ink patterns.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

You can layer different colors.  Because the ink is transparent, you will see the layers through one another.  Just be sure each layer is dry before adding another.  Where the same color overlaps, you will see a deeper shade of the color.  (Top cardstock Ranger Gloss Cardstock.  Lower cardstock Specialty Stamping Paper.)

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

You can also use this technique on other specialty papers and surfaces.  The surface on the left is Ranger Foil Cardstock.  The surface on the right is Tim Holtz Mirror sheets.  The ink moves much faster on the mirror sheets.  It gets a bit cloudy on this surface if you blast it too long.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Clear films are also fun with this technique.  The film on the left is Ranger Shrink Plastic.  The film on the right is Tim Holtz Frosted sheets.  Ranger Shrink Plastic comes clear so it is a great surface to use for projects without shrinking!

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

To create the card shown above, apply Pearl Alcohol Ink to a piece of Ranger Shrink Plastic using an ink applicator tool.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Splatter Snow Cap Alcohol Ink on the plastic on top of the dry Pearl Alcohol Ink.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Blast the Snow Cap Alcohol Ink with the air can.  You may notice that the Alcohol Ink Mixatives do not spread as much as the colors.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Drip Silver Mixative onto the plastic over the dry inks.  Blast the Silver Mixative with canned air to spread it.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

If you would like to create splatters in the ink, sprinkle a bit of Alcohol Ink Blending solution onto the plastic.  Allow the solution to blend and break up the ink where it lands.  It will create some specks in the inks like water splatters do to Distress Inks.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Tap over the surface with a clean dry ink applicator tool with felt to remove any excess blending solution.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

When the blending solution is dry, drip cool light blue alcohol inks (Cloudy Blue and Aqua) onto the surface.  Blast the inks with canned air to create movement and pattern in the drips.

I really love how the plastic looks here.  It reminds me so much of frost on a window during winter.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Die cut and emboss the inked Shrink Plastic using the Tim Holtz Layered Snowflake die and Texture Fade set.  Die cut two additional smaller snowflakes using the Tim Holtz Stacked Snowflakes die.  The die cuts can be used with the shiny side or the inked side up.  They are both so pretty!

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Drip alcohol ink onto a Tim Holtz Gumdrop to create a dimensional center for the large snowflake. (Color shown: Cloudy Blue.)

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Tear a scrap piece of pattern paper to fit the front of a card created with Kraft Cardstock.  If you are using double sided pattern paper, crinkle and curl the edge back to show off the color and pattern on the back side of the paper.  Brush the edges of the paper with Gathered Twigs Distress Ink using an ink blending tool.  Wrap the the pattern paper with a Crinkle Ribbon tied into a bow.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Adhere the paper and bow to the front of the card.  Add the three snowflakes.

This is one of those cards that you really need to see in person to fully get just how pretty it is.  The layers of color on the Shrink Film are so pretty as they show through to the front.  Wouldn’t these snowflakes be so pretty hanging on a Christmas tree with the lights shining behind them?  I may have to make more and do that!

Tammy

tammytutterow2014

Tammy Tutterow is the Social Media Manager for Ranger Ink.  She lives near St. Louis, MO.  Tammy is a two time Ranger U graduate.  She is big fan of inky hands and loves writing tutorials online and teaching classes in stores.  

You can learn more about Tammy on her blog: Tammy Tutterow- Tutorials for Inky Hands.



Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

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116 thoughts on “Alcohol Ink + Canned Air Effects

  1. Incredible. How beautiful. Just a quick question, if you shrink the plastic, will the alcohol colors become really dark and intense? The texture would be gone, unless you place some texture when the shrinking is done, but the color will get dark, right? Thanks for your very informative tutorials. Your steps are always just right and very easy to understand.