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Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi

March 23rd, 2017

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi  | www.rangerink.com

Signature Designer Wendy Vecchi shares with us how to create this thank you card using her new Mini Archival Inks!

Find Wendy’ tutorial in our Projects Library: Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 1: Insert 4 1/4 x 4 3/4 inch heavy stock base into the corner of the Stamp Platform. I cut this a little larger to allow for room for the magnets. Position the rectangle collage background stamp in place in the platform.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 2: Ink the stamp with both Potting Soil and Watering Can. The mini pads work great for this!

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 3: Position the Select-A-Sentiment stamp over the base. Ink the leaf areas with the mini Leaf Green pad and stamp.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 4: Ink the whole stamp with Jet Black, then wipe away the ink from the leaves with a towel. Stamp and repeat as needed to have a fully inked image. DRY. Trim the excess cardstock, using the stamp edges as a guide. Ink the cardstock edges lightly with Potting Soil.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 5: Use the Blending Tool to ink the base with Sky Blue, leaving the label area uninked. Position the stripes stencil toward the left and use Sky Blue again to stencil stripes above & below the label.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 6: Make a loop of painter’s tape to hold the card base securely to the craft sheet. Choose the sentiment from the Select-A-Stencil (I chose thank you) and position in the label area. I moved it to the far right, to leave room for the flower. BUT…you could center it and use no flower or you could position the sentiment far left & add the flower on the right.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 7: Move the rotating window in place and use a post-it to mask off the heart area in the bottom rotating window. Ink the Blending Tool with Jet Black, place it over the stencil, then twist & turn to add ink. The stencil protects the background. DRY.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 8: Ink the mat mini leaves with Leaf Green, then ink the herringbone stamp with Fern Green & stamp over the leaves.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 9: Ink the mat mini flower with Forget-Me-Not, then add polka dots with the stencil and Watering Can. Add shading to the petal edges with Potting Soil.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 10: Place a piece of the Tape Strip on the Craft Sheet and it will hold the rose in place. Paint the rose with a paint brush and Forget-Me-Not Enamel Accents and allow to dry. When dry (about 2 minutes) swipe the mini Potting Soil pad over the raised edges to add more detail. Glue the rose to the center of the mat mini flower with Multi Medium.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 11: Use the Forget-Me-Not Enamel Accents to fill in the dots on the stamped image & allow to dry. I also added dots to the ends of the flourish on the left.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 12: Add the card base to a slightly larger black cardstock base & then to a heavy stock card.

Archival Ink Thank You Card by Wendy Vecchi | www.rangerink.com

Step 13: Add the black mat mini heart, the leaves & flower as shown, to the left side.

Things to Note:

  • The small size of the Archival pads makes it very convenient to add ink to small areas. Multiple colors on one stamp really makes it even more interesting & changes the look of the stamp.
  • Hooray for coordinating Enamel Accents! Sticking with a color palette make it foolproof.
  • Since the stenciling was done with Archival Ink, clean your stencil with rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol. Archival Inks are waterproof, so water will not remove ink from the stencil.
  • Enamel Accents have multiple uses. Painting embellishments with them is an easy way to coordinate them with your project & give them new life. The dots add shine & texture. Clean the paint brush with water before the Enamel Accents dry.
  • Every sentiment on the stencil fits in the label area of the stamp. It’s also fun to combine words for different sentiments. The stamp can be rotated and used vertically too.
  • Wendy Studio490 

    Wendy VecchiWendy Vecchi is a Signature Artist for Ranger Ink.  Her designer series archival inks and embossing powders take inspiration for a vintage country garden color palette.  Wendy also designs a line of stamps, stencils, Art Parts, and Clearly for Art with Stamper’s Anonymous.  You can learn more about Wendy, get a link to her blog, see projects and videos by Wendy, and check out her teaching schedule on her Ranger Designer Page. Be sure to follow our Wendy Vecchi Pinterest board for even more inspiration!

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    March 20th, 2017

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera  | www.rangerink.com

    Guest Designer Milagros Rivera shares with us how to create this spring time inspired Dina Wakley Media Board!

    Find Milagros’ tutorial in our Projects Library: Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Do you sometimes wonder about the possibilities your stamps may bring your way? I do and with the new Fronds stamps by Dina I kinda had this butterfly vision in my head that I had to put to the test! You see Spring is coming over, not much changes over in my island but I’ve seen pictures of crocus breaking ground and it’s exciting! Pretty soon the ground will be filled with blooms and butterflies and that is the inspiration for my project.

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Step 1: Grab your supplies, stamp the big and medium open fronds over your tissue paper. I’m using embossing powder in black because my intention is to flip them over to create a mirror image, the darker the better! Once you have all the pieces, hand cut them and with the Gel Medium adhere them to your journal page. I have a confession: the new Ranger and Ice Resin Squeegee is my new addiction! It will help eliminate any pockets of air between your tissue and your surface, it’ll run so smooth you’ll start wondering where it was all your life!

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Step 2: Using your Squeegee, yes, again, apply Gesso over your page to set the stage for your paints. You will notice you use less product, it dries faster and is more efficient. Since my inspiration is springtime I wanted to subdue Dina’s bold colors into a pastel palette by using white. And guess what Mr. Squeegee, you’ll use it to mix and apply the paint, it also works to apply paint over stencils too!

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Step 3: By prepping your media board with gesso you have made it easy to use a baby wipe to remove paint using your stencils, that same paint can be smeared over the stencil in a different color base or even on the plain gessoed surface. Now it’s time to collage the wings using Gel Medium and prep them with the Clear Gesso. Then clean your stamp by ghosting the images directly on your journal. Using the Scribble Sticks, give her color and cheeks some color.

    Springtime Media Board by Milagros Rivera

    Step 4: Use a watercolor brush to work the watercolor magic of the new Scribble Sticks. Use the Enamel Accents to give the coat some buttons and give the shoes some patent leather look. Using some wipes “clean” the pink color over your stencils to give a subtle floral effect in your background. Then play with your alpha stencil to write your quote with the Fudeball, I loved mixing the different heights in the letters to give the words some movement.

    Milagros RiveraHello! My name is Milagros C Rivera and I’m a mixed media artists who loves to explore and experiment with all kinds of mediums. I was raised in a creative home, everybody did something ceramics, sewing, baking, jewelry, wood, glass, no medium was off limits! I continue to play and learn without having to restrict myself to just one thing! I live in the sunny island of Puerto Rico with my husband, 2 amazing kids and a menagerie of pets that make my life complete! I’m currently on the Design Team and Social Media Coordinator for Relics and Artifacts. You can find me on my blog as well as follow me on Instagram, Snapguide, and YouTube.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit

    March 16th, 2017

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit  | www.rangerink.com

    Guest Designer Audrey Pettit shares with us how to create this adorable St. Patrick’s Day vignette box using Tim Holtz Distress® Products!

    Find Audrey’s tutorial in our Projects Library: Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Creating handmade home décor pieces is an easy and fun way to add a bit of spirit to your home for the holidays and seasons. Join me today as we create a whimsical vignette box for spring and St. Paddy’s Day using lots of fabulous Tim Holtz Distress products.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Let’s get started!

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 1: To begin, prime the sides of an Idea-ology Vignette Box with Picket Fence Distress Paint. Allow the paint to dry completely, and then cover all four sides and the top edge of the box frame with a variety of Design Tape. You can skip painting the box first, if you wish. But I find that the white paint underneath really helps emphasize the design elements on the tape.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Cut patterned paper to fit all four inside edges of the box, as well as the back panel. Adhere the papers using Ranger Multi Medium Matte and a foam brush.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 2: Dab a bit of Cracked Pistachio Distress Ink into the box using a Mini Ink Blending Tool. And then spread Vintage Distress Collage Medium generously all around the inside and outside of the box. Set the box aside to dry completely.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 3: Paint Multi Medium Matte into all four inside corners, and cover the adhesive with Distress Glitter Dust. Shake all excess glitter into a coffee filter, and pour it back into your container. Set the box aside to dry.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 4: Select a Clippings or Small Chat sticker and apply it to a piece of raw chipboard. Trim around the sticker and then age it a bit with Brushed Corduroy Distress Ink.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 5: Cut a few thin strips of paper to use as brackets for the sentiment. Fold the strips into an “L” shape, and cut the length to fit the depth of your box. Adhere the foot of the strip to the back of the sentiment, and then adhere the back of the strips onto the bottom of the box. Pour Distress Glitter onto any exposed adhesive.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 6: Color a Found Relatives die cut with Distress Markers, and watercolor using an Tim Holtz Waterbrush.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 7: Apply Picket Fence to the clover Adornments charm, and allow the paint to set for a minute before wiping away the excess. Color the clover with a Distress Marker. Cover the charm with Glossy Accents, and set it aside to dry.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 8: Apply a variety of green Distress Inks to a piece of watercolor cardstock using the waterbrush. Let the paper dry, or speed up the process with a heat tool.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 9: Die cut the three smallest hearts from the Heartfelt Bigz Die several times from the inked watercolor paper to create clovers. You need three hearts for each clover. Cover the hearts with Crazing Distress Collage Medium. Set them aside to dry.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 10: Scribble a bit of Vintage Photo Distress Crayon onto your Craft Sheet. Pick up the pigment using your waterbrush, and apply it to the crazing. Let the pigment soak into the cracks, and then wipe off the excess with a clean cloth or paper towel.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 11: Punch clouds from Watercolor Cardstock. Ink with Brushed Corduroy Distress Ink, and then coat the edges with Vintage Collage Medium. Once the medium is dry, adhere the clouds to the back of the vignette box. To create depth, adhere some pieces flat to the box with Multi Medium Matte adhesive, and pop some up with thicknesses of foam tape. Adhere moss to the bottom of the box. Adhere the clover charm to the girls neck using Multi Medium Matte, and once the adhesive has set for a minute, stitch a small bow around the charm using a needle and thread. Apply four thicknesses of foam tape to the backside of the girl die cut. Adhere her into the box.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    Step 12: To create the clovers, place a small dot of Multi Medium Matte adhesive at the points of the hearts, and glue three hearts together. Gather some small twigs from your yard, and adhere pieces to the back. Place foam onto the back of the clovers, and add them to your box.

    Lucky is a State of Mind Box by Audrey Pettit | www.rangerink.com

    audrey pettitMy name is Audrey Pettit. I live in Cary, North Carolina and have two wonderful kiddos, Peter and Nicole. I started scrapbooking and card-making about a decade ago after being invited to a friend’s house for a stamping party. That party opened my eyes to a whole new world of paper-crafting, and I have never looked back.  Visit Audrey’s blog at: AudreyPettit.Wordpress.com.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston

    March 13th, 2017

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston  | www.rangerink.com

    Guest Designer Anita Houston shares with us how to create this festive St. Patrick’s themed card using Tim Holtz Distress® Crayons!

    Find Anita’s tutorial in our Projects Library: Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 1: Using a piece of Woodgrain Cardstock and Distress Crayons, color in a Mustard Seed circle in the middle of the card. Smudge it out with a warm finger. Color Twisted Citron around that, and again smudge in and blend with the Mustard Seed. Repeat again, using Mowed Lawn, and finishing with Broken China until all the card is colored.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 2: Shave off about 1/8 inch of Mustard Seed with a palette knife. Add two squirts of water, and grind it up with the palette knife until a thick paint-like paste is made. Using a clean Blending Tool, soak up the paste. Lay the Industrial Stencil at the top of the card, and stencil in the word “Lucky.” The crayon blends with the color underneath, and make a yellow border around the word. Clean the foam with water. Do the same with Twisted Citron, and the word “Found” along the right side, and again with Broken China and the series of “numbers” along the bottom edge.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 3: Again, slice off 1/8 inch of Picket Fence, add two squirts of water, and grind up with the palette knife. Soak it up with a clean foam, and lay the Arrows stencil in the upper right corner next to the word Lucky, and stencil in an arrow. Take the Splotches stencil and stencil in three larger circles on the left side, and one smaller in the lower right corner. Clean the foam.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 4: Grind up some Mowed Lawn, and soak it up with the foam, and stencil in the smaller portions of the Chevron Stencil as shown. Clean the foam.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 5: Lay the Bubble Stencil over the card, and this time scribble Mustard Seed randomly over the stencil, not moving it. Use your warm finger to stencil in the color. Dry the card thoroughly.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 6: Shake and prime the White Paint Pen. Trace around the words on the card to make them pop.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 7: Using a scrap of Watercolor Cardstock the length of the card, color it with Mowed Lawn and Twisted Citron, and blend together with the Broad Waterbrush. Trim off about 1/4 inch and use scissors to fringe the piece, creating a grass-like look. Punch out about four of the shamrocks with the rest. Ink the edges of both of these with Vintage Photo Archival.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 8: Trim the card into four random pieces, making sure the words and numbers are complete on each piece. Trim another piece of Watercolor Cardstock 4.25×5.5 inches to be used as a backing. Add strips of adhesive to the back of the four pieces of card, and adhere them on the Watercolor backing as shown, so now the card is horizontal. Use a Craft Pick to make holes for the Long Fasteners, which go between the letters of “Lucky,” along the rest of the top of the card, and along the bottom edge. Using a Detail Waterbrush and the Broken China Distress Crayons to color in the edges of the white Watercolor backing.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 9: Stamp the bulldog in Black Soot Archival onto more Watercolor Cardstock twice, color in the bulldog and coordinating pieces with Distress Crayons and the Detail Waterbrush using the Craft Sheet as your palette, by directly scribbling on the Crayons and picking it up with the brush.

    Lucky Dog St. Patrick’s Day Card by Anita Houston | www.rangerink.com

    Step 10: Die cut the pieces out using the coordinating Framelits, and assemble with Foam Tape. Color in the Typed Token with Mowed Lawn, and rub off the Crayons that are not in the recessed areas. Attach this to the collar using another Long Fastener. Attach the dog to the card using Foam Tape, and the grass to the bottom edge using Multi Medium. Mount this on a black card backing cut 4.5×5.75 inches using Adhesive Strips. Add the shamrocks to the circles using Multi Medium, and one next to the dog using Foam Tape.

    Anita HoustonMy name is Anita Houston, aka, The Artful Maven, and I have been crafting ever since Jr. High School along with my mother. Touching, manipulating, and creating pieces to make something wonderful makes me happy! I love everything paper, paint, wax, metal, wood, and all things Ranger. I was fortunate to be selected to go to Ranger U in 2012, and have been teaching and designing Mixed Media Art ever since. You can see my work on my website at : http://www.artfulmaven.net/.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney

    March 9th, 2017

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney  | www.rangerink.com

    Guest Designer Paula Cheney shares with us how how to create this beautiful framed panel using new Tim Holtz Distress® Oxides!

    Find Paula’s tutorial in our Projects Library: Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 1: Gather supplies, including Distress Oxide Ink, Distress Crayons and Mixed Media Heavystock Tags.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 2: Add Distress Oxides Iced Spruce and Fossilized Amber plus Distress Ink Aged Mahogany to a Non-Stick Craft Sheet. Make sure inks do not touch. Spray droplets of water over the inks using a Distress Spray bottle.

    NOTE: Because ink is suspended in the pad, you must press down on the ink pad when applying it to the Craft Sheet.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 3: Press or swipe a Mixed Media Heavystock Tag through the inks, picking up a little of each color. Begin drying the tag with Heat It Tool. Before the tag is completely dry, slowly pull the trigger of the Distress Sprayer to add larger water droplets over the tag and begin drying again. The additional water will make the ink separate and wick out to and create a chalky oxidized look. Very cool!

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 4: Repeat steps until you are satisfied with the color.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 5: Create at least three tags that are similar in coloring.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 6: Using Vintage Photo Distress Oxide, stamp over one tag using the Vines & Roses stamp set.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 7: Use the Distress Sprayer to add water over the stamped image. Watch the Distress Oxide ink start to blur and separate. Start the drying process right away to control the spread of the ink.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 8: Once all tags are dry, cut them up into different size pieces.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 9: Use a Distress Brush and Distress Collage Medium to adhere the paper pieces to the back of a Framed Panel that has been previously painted with Picket Fence Distress Paint. Set aside to dry.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 10: Use your finger tip to smear a thin layer of Distress Grit-Paste on the edges of a Mini Cabinet Card Frame. Let dry completely.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 11: Once dry, scribble over the Grit-Paste and frame with Aged Mahogany and Gathered Twigs Distress Crayons. Spritz with a light mist of water and rub the crayon into the frame. If you rub too much away, you can always add more.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 12: Use Distress Markers to tint a Paper Doll by coloring the image and then rubbing away the excess ink with a cotton swab.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 13: Spray at least two bunches of paper flowers from the Bouquet pack with Antique Linen Distress Stain Spray. Make sure the front and back are covered. Let dry completely.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 14: Slip a small piece of linen from the Textile Surfaces pack into the Mini Cabinet Card Frame. Adhere Paper Doll, Clippings Stickers and Adornments wand to the Framed Panel with Collage Medium. Drop all the paper flowers onto frame and glue where they fall to create an organic look. Add string that has been colored with Vintage Photo Distress Ink to the flowers using Collage Medium.

    Distress Oxide Framed Panel by Paula Cheney | www.rangerink.com

    Step 15: Once paper flowers are secure, add a bit of Stickles Platinum onto each flower stamen for a little bit of sparkle.

    Paula Cheney

    I have been a “maker” all my life. Sewing, stamping, paper arts, I love it all. Creating and teaching is a passion for me, whether it is in the classroom or on my blog, One Lucky Day. I have worked in the scrapbooking/mixed media field since 2005 and for the last five years I have worked as the Creative Coordinator for Tim Holtz Brands, a dream job if there ever was one. On a personal note, I live on the Central Coast of California with my husband, Jay. I love to travel to new places to look for old junk and am willing to pack a bag at a moment’s notice. On an ordinary day you can find me working away in my craft room with the windows wide open and music playing in the background.