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Ranger Blog: Tim Holtz® Adirondack®

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Galaxies have been a widely popular design element in the last couple of years. Their beautiful blend of color makes them a wonderful background on which to write or stamp an inspirational greeting. Below, I’ll guide you through the simple steps of layering Alcohol Inks to make a stunning galaxy background and then add a hand- lettered sentiment.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 1: Working on a Craft Sheet, apply the first layer of color. Beginning with Sunshine Yellow, add a couple drops of Alcohol Ink onto the Ink Applicator and swipe it onto the cardstock. Repeat with the remaining colors, working from light to dark in a random pattern and using a clean felt for each.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 2: Add several drops of Alcohol Blending Solution to a clean felt. Apply it over the entire surface of the cardstock using a dabbing motion only. This will cause the layer of color to lighten and blend slightly.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 3: Again, using a dabbing motion only, apply another layer of each of the Alcohol Ink colors from lightest to darkest. Dabbing instead of swiping on the color ensures a mottled, celestial effect is achieved for the final result.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 4: Dab on another layer of Alcohol Blending Solution. The colors should now be quite blended with no harsh lines between neighboring colors.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 5: Continue adding more color and blending with Alcohol Blending Solution until the galaxy is to your liking. Here, I wanted a darker effect, so I added more Indigo.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 6: To create background stars, lightly dampen the bristles of an old toothbrush and dip them into the pigment ink pad. Pointing the head of the toothbrush at your page, run your thumb over the bristles to splatter the cardstock.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Step 7: To complete your masterpiece, add a hand-written sentiment with the Dylusions paint pen. To create the look of modern calligraphy, first write in a flowy script style. Then thicken up the downstrokes, which are any lines that were made by moving the pen in a downward motion (toward your body). Use the paint pen to dot on some foreground stars as a final detail.

Alcohol Ink Galaxy by Kim Haskell | www.rangerink.com

Kim Haskell

Hello! My name is Kim Haskell and I am a lettering, mixed media, and watercolor enthusiast living in Nova Scotia, Canada. My love of art started so young that my mom jokes that I was born with a pencil in my hand. While I grew up drawing and painting, my creative life took a brief hiatus in adulthood while I pursued a technology career. In 2015, I fell in love with the art of calligraphy and hand lettering and my fingers have been perpetually inky ever since. When I am not lettering you can find me near the ocean enjoying time with my hubby and our French Bulldogs.

My Instagram :  https://www.instagram.com/wednesdayswelldesign/

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Looking for some winter inspiration in an island with no snow can be quite the task! So I searched my head and remembered one of my dreams, that of seeing the Northern Lights at least once in my lifetime! When Ranger put together an Alcohol Ink Kit I decided to jump in to have it all, again with the island situation, alcohol inks don’t fly so I patiently waited five weeks for them to come by boat! But I was soooo happy, in it was a set of stamps that had the perfect sentiment: Own your Dreams!
Tim Holtz has this quote in another set of stamps “Out of limitations comes creativity,” it’s one I’ve used quite a number of times because of the truth it carries. So back to my card, I wanted to create the Aurora Borealis but my kit only provided Stream, Sunshine Yellow and Red Pepper… Sooo here comes creativity to the rescue, I decided to experiment with Ice Resin tints since I had Lolite and Beryl and they looked like the thing I needed!

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 1: Squirt a line of beryl and lolite in your applicator tool with felt.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 2: Swipe the applicator down your paper, I was going for the Northern Lights so I swirled and gave it some movement.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 3: Squirt the Stream Alcohol Ink on your applicator tool and finish that sky!

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 4: Add some Blending Solution to help you shade the blue in the sky.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 5: Add Archival Ink to your pine trees stamp. Check out the swirl I created at the bottom of the stamp by using the Applicator Tool to remove some of the ink and in doing so decrease the line that the stamp has. I did not follow protocol here, I started stamping some of the trees on the left and some of the trees on the right, varying the height and leaving my northern lights to be the star. We’re going for a forest vibe here!

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 6: Now you’re ready for a blizzard! Load an old brush with the Distress Grit Paste (insert addicted to the stuff here) and spray those trees away!

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 7: I used some Distress Rock Candy Glitter over the wet paste. Then I stamped Own your Dreams inside my card.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 8: Here comes experiment #2! I squirted Ice Resin tints Lolite and Beryl and Stream Alcohol Ink along with some mixative over my Craft Sheet.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 9: Using my stamp I swirled the colors together.

Own Your Dreams by Milagros Rivera

Step 10: I hand stamped over a blank porcelain mug!

Milagros RiveraHello! My name is Milagros C Rivera and I’m a mixed media artists who loves to explore and experiment with all kinds of mediums. I was raised in a creative home, everybody did something ceramics, sewing, baking, jewelry, wood, glass, no medium was off limits! I continue to play and learn without having to restrict myself to just one thing! I live in the sunny island of Puerto Rico with my husband, 2 amazing kids and a menagerie of pets that make my life complete! I’m currently on the Design Team and Social Media Coordinator for Relics and Artifacts. You can find me on my blog as well as follow me on Instagram, Snapguide, and YouTube.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Thanks for stopping by the Ranger blog today for a cool tutorial from Ranger’s Creative Director Tim Holtz using Alcohol Inks and the new Yupo.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 1: Yupo is a versatile surface especially suited for mixed media techniques using Alcohol Inks. Available in White or Translucent, this smooth synthetic heavyweight 86lb surface resist buckling and dries quickly. Unlike Alcohol Ink Cardstock (aka Glossy Cardstock) which is very porous, Yupo has completely different properties allowing you to layer and remove Alcohol Inks to create amazing backgrounds. For this tutorial we are creating three cards using a single sheet of White Yupo.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 2: Before we start, gather several colors of Alcohol Inks to use, a single Metallic Mixative color, and your bottle of Alcohol Blending Solution. Also make sure you’re working in a well ventilated area as these products all contain solvents.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 3: Since Alcohol Inks have a fast drying time (approx. 7-10 seconds) I’m grouping the step-out photos so it’s easier to see the process since once you start, you will need to work quickly. Begin by shaking the Mixative allowing the mixing ball to rattle and apply a scribble to your Craft Sheet. Apply various colors of Alcohol Inks over the Mixative in drips, dashes, etc. (you can use as many colors as you wish, but we will be adding more later so don’t overthink the ink). Next shake on Alcohol Blending Solution over inks (about 3-5 shakes is plenty). Now swipe the Yupo through the mixture in a sweeping motion – not a swirling one.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 4: I’ll be honest that the first swipe usually doesn’t look the greatest, but one thing that makes Yupo so cool is the ability to layer color with ease since this is synthetic and not porous. Add any additional ink colors and a dash of Blending Solution to the same area of your Craft Sheet and swipe again. You’ll notice the new ink color actually replaces what was there so you literally cannot make mud! Continue adding more colors until your desired look is achieved.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 5: *Note: Before we start this part I have a few words of advice – BE PATIENT. You will need to perform these steps several times and if you’re in a rush and use too much Blending Solution, it will seep under the stencil and blur your design. If that happens, you’ll need to start from the very beginning layering your inks again – you can use the same piece of Yupo.

Our background is going to take on a whole new level of depth by adding patterned imagery using stencils. Start by adding a few drops of Blending Solution to the Craft Sheet and pick up the solution using a clean piece of Blending Foam on the tool. Immediately place your stencil on the background, and with a light circular motion, rub the foam through the stencil lifting the color. Once you feel the foam “squeaking” on the surface you will need to add a few more drops of Blending Solution to the Craft Sheet, pick it up with the foam again, and repeat the process. Continue with various stencil designs in different areas, but be sure to leave some of the colorful background alone.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 6: So now we have an awesome, colorful, mixed media background ready to use for our cards. The reason I like to create by backgrounds on a single sheet and then cut it up is that I find it to be less planned and more random. Yupo is 5” x 7” so cut the sheet to three 5” x 2 1/4” sections leaving a 1/4” strip to toss.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 7: Stamp the Wildflower using Archival Ink and immediately cover with Black Embossing Powder. I prefer Archival Ink to stamp on Yupo vs. Embossing Ink since we are stamping on a slick and synthetic surface and I find the Archival doesn’t slide as much.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 8: Heat emboss the image making sure to keep the heat tool moving. Yupo is a plastic so if you stay too long in one area you could risk melting or warping the surface. I’ve found it to be fairly heat stable though and have never had a problem embossing on it.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 9: I like to matte my backgrounds on a black piece of cardstock leaving a thin border which makes the image pop more. Adhesive strips or any double sided tape works best when adhering Yupo vs. liquid adhesives.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 10: Cut three 6” x 6” pieces of Kraft Cardstock and fold each one in half to create a 3” x 6” card. Ink the edges of the cards with Distress Ink using a new piece of Blending Foam. Splatter some water droplets on the inked areas and dry with a heat tool for a cool effect.

Artful Botanicals by Tim Holtz | www.rangerink.com
Step 11: Finish the cards by layering over a piece of Textured Surface Burlap, adding some sticking along the edges, and attaching a Word Band as a simple embellishment. Pretty great creating three stunning, colorful, and layered cards from a single sheet of Yupo. I hope you’re inspired to play and give this fun technique a try. The possibilities are only limited to your imagination…

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
My name is Sharen AK Harris, I’m a master alcohol ink artist. I live in Tucson, AZ where the sky is big and blue and the colors glow like Alcohol Ink and stimulate thoughts of paintings to come.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
I’m so excited to show you how to do fine art flowers with Alcohol Ink. I know you will be so surprised how easy and great your painting will come out. It is truly addicting and so much fun to do. You and your friends will be amazed with your beautiful work.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 1: Pour a two drops of Poppiefield on the Yupo paper.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 2: Take the back of your brush to direct the ink. You may add more ink as you need to make the desired size.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 3: Using your liner brush with a little Poppyfield ink make the edges uneven, like a poppy. You will repeat this step for the other poppies but change the direction of the other 2 poppies as shown below. You can add extra petals for interest.
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 4: I put Ranger Alcohol Blending Solution in one of the wells and put a good amount of fluid on my brush. It doesn’t matter if there is some red leaking off.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 5: Put a drop from your brush where the center of your flower is. Then get a little more solution but not as loaded. Tap off a bit on the paper towel so your brush is just damp. Make a circle around the inner circle about ¼ inch away from the center, as shown in the example.

The ink will move and do all kinds of magic. You never know exactly how it will turn out, but you can manipulate the ink. Since the ink does have a mind of its own you get a wonderful spontaneous look that is beautiful and realistic. We so often try to make things perfect and things come out stiff and unnatural. With this art form, and the nature of the ink, it helps keep us loose and free like the ink.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 6: For the lower right poppy, I dampen down the liner brush again and start from the front outer edge and pulling to the back. This will lighten up the edge of the petals as shown in the example.
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Add some Pesto ink to another well on the palette. With your liner brush, dip into the ink and put a couple of brush loads into another well. Swirl your brush into it until it thickens up a bit. It won’t take long.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 7: With the tip of your liner brush just barely touch the brush to the surface. It will begin to break into little circles. Isn’t that so neat how that happens. You can also use the same brush to start pulling stems at this time.
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
You can darken parts of the stem closest to the flowers. That is where the shadows are. They can be tapped on with a thicker dryer Pesto.
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Add a bud and some extra stems for additional flowers at this time. Make a squigly line for the stem of the bud. I paint the bud with my liner brush. The bud is only an oval and it isn’t perfect. Nothing in nature is perfect and that’s what makes it look realistic.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 8: This is a good time to clean your liner brush. All you have to do is dip it into the Blending Solution and wipe it out on a paper towel until it comes out clean.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 9: Fill another well with a few drops of Honeycomb ink. Using your liner brush just make 4 or 5 strokes for a little yellow flower along the pesto stem.

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Step 10: Using the sharp point side of the Alcohol Ink Blending Pen, lift paint off of the side you want lighter.

With this pen you can clean up any little areas you like. You can move the paint nicely with this pen to help blend your lights into the dark. Try tapping the tip into the color to break some of the color up. I also use the pen as a painting tool for fine lines. Just put it into some dry ink and draw the stem on. This is a wonderful tool I cannot live without. Below are many examples of these techniques.
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris

Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
Alcohol Ink Flower Painting by Sharen AK Harris
I love the pen especially for signing my work with the color I have been using in the painting.

With the dirty pen put some small dots around the painting for interest. Clean the color off just by wiping the tip off on a paper towel. Walla, you’re done with your beautiful masterpiece! I hope you will enjoy doing this beautiful poppy project.

Sharen AK HarrisI have been painting since I was 3. I have studios and have taught classes from Alaska to Massachusetts. I now reside in Tucson AZ where I paint & teach Alcohol ink painting, oil and watercolor. You can see more wonderful alcohol ink paintings and other work I do at my sites on the World Wide Web. I invite you to my web pages: sakharris.blogspot.com, or on Facebook, and on Sharenakharris.com. Thank you and until next time. Love to paint!

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.com

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 1: Cut out 8 leaves each from Foil Cardstock and plastic packaging using the Layered Leaf die. Then emboss each leaf with the Layered Leaf Texture Fade.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 2: Working on the Non-Stick Craft Sheet, apply several drops of assorted colors of Alcohol Ink and then some Blending Solution on the Ink Blending Tool with foam and then stamp the color onto the foil and plastic leaves. Of the colors described above, just mix and match to make different combinations.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 3: Cut two 32-inch lengths of the grapevines. Form a 10-inch ring from each of the vines and attach the ends with wire. Then wire both rings together down at the bottom.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 4: Cut a 36-inch length of boxwood and wrap around both rings.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 5: Wrap several strands of raffia around the wreath and tie the ends together.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 6: Cut 8-inch lengths from the remaining boxwood and then just attach them randomly around the wreath.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 7: Glue the plastic leaves on top of the foil leaves. Place a heavy object over top of them and let dry.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 8: Draw an 11” x 2-1/2” curvy banner on a piece of black foam board and cut it out with a craft knife. Sand the edges, if needed, to make it smooth. Paint the Banner with Walnut Stain Distress Paint. Let dry.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 9: Place the Woodgrain Stencil over the banner and apply Espresso Distress Paint. Let dry and repeat to stencil the whole banner. Let dry.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 10: Lightly spritz Heirloom Gold Perfect Pearls over banner.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 11: Cut “WELCOME” from Foil Cardstock using Vintage Market Die. Ink with the same colors of Alcohol In as previous.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 12: Attach Black Foam Adhesive to the back of the letters. Remove liner paper and adhere to banner.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 13: Make a bow out of raffia and adhere at the bottom of the wreath with a glue gun.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 14: Adhere Banner to wreath with a glue gun.

Welcome Fall Wreath by Patti Behan | www.rangerink.comStep 15: Attach the leaves and berries as shown with a glue gun.

patti behanHi, Everyone! My name is Patti Behan. I am married to my best friend and mom of three children who make me very proud. I have been a crafter my whole life and have worked in the craft industry for 15 years. I have found my dream job being the Marketing Coordinator here at Ranger, which gives me the opportunity to create and share all the fun things you can do with Ranger products. Hopefully I will inspire you to play along with me. Visit Patti’s blog at: http://www.pattibehan.com/blog/.

Be Thankful Card

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Select a rust color of Kraft Core and emboss using the Burlap Texture Fades embossing folder. Next, sand the cardstock lightly to reveal the Kraft Color using the Tim Holtz Sanding Grip. Attach to card base using adhesive.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Place a few drops of Liquid Pearls on the Non-Stick Craft Sheet, spritz with water and mix slightly with craft stick to separate the paint.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Take manila tag and press down into the mixture in various places. Take care not to cover the whole tag. You do need some “un-inked” areas. Dry with Heat it Tool.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Then, using an Ink Blending Tool with Foam, rub the two colors of Distress Ink over the tag, covering all bare areas. Wipe the surface of the tag with a rag or paper towel. The ink only sticks to the unpainted areas and creates a very cool contrast with the shimmery Liquid Pearls. Spritz with water droplets and let sit for a few seconds before drying. This gives a nice mottled effect on the Distress Ink. Repeat Steps 2-4 on three additional tags.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Use the Sizzix Leaf Blue print stamp set and stamp four leaves using Jet Black Archival Ink. Cut out the leaves using the coordinating dies and your Sizzix Big Shot.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Dab Distress Stains onto a Non-Stick Craft Sheet and spritz with water. Take the watercolor cardstock and swipe through the ink mixture. Dry with Heat Tool and repeat until desired color is achieved. Glue a piece of tissue wrap to the card using Multi-Medium. Again, spritz some water droplets onto the paper and let sit for a few seconds before drying.

Using Wendy Vecchi’s Archival Ink Potting Soil, stamp “Be Thankful” from the Acorn Blueprint Stamp Set at the top of the card. Ink the edges of the card using Vintage Photo Distress Ink.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Next, scrape embossing paste through the Tim Holtz Layering Stencil. Let dry.

BeThankful by Michelle McCosh | www.rangerink.com

Use Fiber and Plaquette to embellish the card. (I used Mushroom Alcohol Ink to color the Plaquette). Glue the leaves onto background using Glossy Accents. I used two sets of leaves on top of each other to add dimension. Adhere card to Kraft Core base using adhesive foam tape.

Michelle McCosh

Alcohol Ink + Canned Air Effects Card by Tammy Tutterow

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comBegin by dripping alcohol ink onto a non-porous surface.  For this example I am using Ranger’s Glossy Cardstock.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comBegin blowing the ink with the canned air.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAs the air hits the ink, it will cause the ink to move in a burst pattern.  You can continue to blast the ink with air as long as it is wet.  Turn your cardstock as you blast the air to create lots of different directions in the ink patterns.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comYou can layer different colors.  Because the ink is transparent, you will see the layers through one another.  Just be sure each layer is dry before adding another.  Where the same color overlaps, you will see a deeper shade of the color.  (Top cardstock Ranger Gloss Cardstock.  Lower cardstock Specialty Stamping Paper.)

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comYou can also use this technique on other specialty papers and surfaces.  The surface on the left is Ranger Foil Cardstock.  The surface on the right is Tim Holtz Mirror sheets.  The ink moves much faster on the mirror sheets.  It gets a bit cloudy on this surface if you blast it too long.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comClear films are also fun with this technique.  The film on the left is Ranger Shrink Plastic.  The film on the right is Tim Holtz Frosted sheets.  Ranger Shrink Plastic comes clear so it is a great surface to use for projects without shrinking!

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTo create the card shown above, apply Pearl Alcohol Ink to a piece of Ranger Shrink Plastic using an ink applicator tool.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comSplatter Snow Cap Alcohol Ink on the plastic on top of the dry Pearl Alcohol Ink.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comBlast the Snow Cap Alcohol Ink with the air can.  You may notice that the Alcohol Ink Mixatives do not spread as much as the colors.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comDrip Silver Mixative onto the plastic over the dry inks.  Blast the Silver Mixative with canned air to spread it.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comIf you would like to create splatters in the ink, sprinkle a bit of Alcohol Ink Blending solution onto the plastic.  Allow the solution to blend and break up the ink where it lands.  It will create some specks in the inks like water splatters do to Distress Inks.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTap over the surface with a clean dry ink applicator tool with felt to remove any excess blending solution.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comWhen the blending solution is dry, drip cool light blue alcohol inks (Cloudy Blue and Aqua) onto the surface.  Blast the inks with canned air to create movement and pattern in the drips.

I really love how the plastic looks here.  It reminds me so much of frost on a window during winter.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comDie cut and emboss the inked Shrink Plastic using the Tim Holtz Layered Snowflake die and Texture Fade set.  Die cut two additional smaller snowflakes using the Tim Holtz Stacked Snowflakes die.  The die cuts can be used with the shiny side or the inked side up.  They are both so pretty!

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comDrip alcohol ink onto a Tim Holtz Gumdrop to create a dimensional center for the large snowflake. (Color shown: Cloudy Blue.)

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTear a scrap piece of pattern paper to fit the front of a card created with Kraft Cardstock.  If you are using double sided pattern paper, crinkle and curl the edge back to show off the color and pattern on the back side of the paper.  Brush the edges of the paper with Gathered Twigs Distress Ink using an ink blending tool.  Wrap the the pattern paper with a Crinkle Ribbon tied into a bow.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdhere the paper and bow to the front of the card.  Add the three snowflakes.

This is one of those cards that you really need to see in person to fully get just how pretty it is.  The layers of color on the Shrink Film are so pretty as they show through to the front.  Wouldn’t these snowflakes be so pretty hanging on a Christmas tree with the lights shining behind them?  I may have to make more and do that!


tammytutterow2014Tammy Tutterow is the Social Media Manager for Ranger Ink.  She lives near St. Louis, MO.  Tammy is a two time Ranger U graduate.  She is big fan of inky hands and loves writing tutorials online and teaching classes in stores.  You can learn more about Tammy on her blog: Tammy Tutterow- Tutorials for Inky Hands.

Alcohol Ink Shrink Plastic Snowflakes by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Pin it to remember it! Want more great Ranger ideas?  Check out our boards on Pinterest!

Shimmery Holiday Card featuring Alcohol Inks by Tammy Tutterow

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comBegin by applying two drops of Pearl and one drop of Silver Alcohol Ink Mixatives to the felt of an ink applicator tool.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comPounce the ink applicator tool randomly over a piece of Glossy Cardstock cut to fit your card front.  Rotate the card front as you pounce to help keep the application random.  Although this card front looks white, it is actually completely covered with Pearl and Silver.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdd drops of Cloudy Blue and Aqua Alcohol Ink onto the card front.  As you learned last week, blast the ink with canned air to create movement and pattern in the ink.  Rotate the card front as you spray the air to move the ink in different directions.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdd drops of different green inks to the felt.  The fresh ink will reactivate the remaining Silver and Pearl inks.  (Green inks used: Lettuce, Meadow, and Bottle.)

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comCut a piece of Glossy Cardstock large enough to fit the selected die cuts.  Pounce the ink over the cardstock.  The light areas of the cardstock is Silver.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdd a darker shade of green to the felt.  (Color shown: Pesto.)

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comPounce the darker green randomly over the cardstock.  Allow the new ink to interact with the dried inks on the cardstock.  The fresh ink will add a speckling effect where it interacts with the dried inks.

Tip: While you have your inks out and have a color combination you love, go ahead and ink extra pieces of cardstock.  You can set them aside for die cutting another day for another project when you don’t have time to ink paper.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comDie cut greenery pieces from the cardstock.  (Die shown: Tim Holtz Sizzix Holiday Greens and Sizzix Magnetic Platform.)

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comThe die cuts will have varying shades of green and a lovely silvery pearl finish.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTo color the branches of the die cuts, place a drop of ink on your craft sheet.  Use an Alcohol Ink Blending Pen with Alcohol Ink Blending Solution.  Use the pen to pick up the ink.  The nib on the pen will soak up the ink.  Use the pen to dab and brush the ink onto the branches.  You may need to apply several coats to achieve the depth of color you would like.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comWhen you are finished, scribble the marker onto a piece of scratch paper until the nib is clean again.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comUse an ink blending tool to apply Potting Soil Archival Ink to the edges of the card front.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comPounce the ink over the tips of the greenery to add additional color to them.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comInk a stamp with both Jet Black and Potting Soil Archival Inks.  Stamp the sentiment in the lower right corner of the card front.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comDry the ink with a heat tool.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdhere the card front to the front of a card made from Kraft Cardstock.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comApply liquid adhesive to the lower part of the greenery pieces.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comLayer the greenery pieces onto the lower left side of the card front.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAdd a dyed Crinkle Ribbon bow to the base of the greenery.  (Did you notice that this ribbon is dyed with Silver and Cloudy Blue?  Next week I will share how to color Crinkle Ribbon with Alcohol Inks!)

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comUse a small piece of thin wire to add a Tim Holtz Tidings Token to the bow.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comThe blasts of color behind the greenery really compliments the shape of the greenery pieces.  The color blasts would also look great in green too!

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comThe Silver and Pearl Mixatives add such a pretty shimmer to the greenery pieces making them feel so wintery!

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comThis card is really so easy to create and oh so pretty!  The silver reminds me so much of vintage style foil gift wrap.  It is so shimmery with a perfect wintery feel!

 


tammytutterow2014Tammy Tutterow is the Social Media Manager for Ranger Ink.  She lives near St. Louis, MO.  Tammy is a two time Ranger U graduate.  She is big fan of inky hands and loves writing tutorials online and teaching classes in stores.  You can learn more about Tammy on her blog: Tammy Tutterow- Tutorials for Inky Hands.

Alcohol Ink Shimmery Holiday Card by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com

Want more great Ranger ideas?  Check out our boards on Pinterest!

Frosty Winter Glass Votive by Tammy Tutterow

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTo embellish the votive, die cut 3-4 holly leaves (die: Tim Holtz Holly Branch) from an aluminum can.  Be very careful as you cut the can open, the edges can be very sharp.  After die cutting the edges will be safe to handle.

For this votive, I also die cut three small snowflakes (Tim Holtz Mini Snowflakes Movers & Shapers) from the scraps of the shrink plastic from the snowflake card in the Alcohol Ink + Canned Air tutorial.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAlthough the mini snowflakes don’t match exactly, you can place them in the Snow Flurries Texture Fade to add embossed texture just like we did for the larger snowflake using the Layered Snowflake die in the canned air and shrink plastic tutorial.  The snowflake in the upper left corner is the best match in size and shape for the die cuts.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comUse an ink applicator tool with felt to apply assorted shades of green alcohol ink to the silver side of the die cuts.  I used 2 drops of Pesto, 1 drop of Lettuce, and 1 drop of Meadow Alcohol Inks.  Tap the ink onto the metal.  Allow the ink to dry before tapping on a second layer.  You will see the fresh ink react with the first layer creating interesting patterns.  At first, while the ink on the felt is wetter, the reaction will be bigger and the colors will be more blended.  As the ink on the felt dries, each application and reaction will be smaller and more defined.  With several several layers the ink will look like it does above.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com You can add texture to the holly leaves by placing them ink side down on a piece of foam and drawing a center vein on them with an embossing stylus.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.com To make the vein more defined, pinch it between your fingers to gently crimp it.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comRub the embossed and crimped lines with a Jet Black Archival Ink pad to make the lines more bold.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comIn the colorizing embellishments tutorial I showed you how you can colorize embellishments by simply dripping alcohol ink onto them.  I used that same technique to colorize small wired pearl stems.  The pearl stems I used are vintage millinery supplies, but you can find stems like these pre-made in floral and wedding supply sections of craft stores.  You can also create them fairly easily by placing beads on thin wire and twisting into a stem shape.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comIn the Shimmery Holiday Card Tutorial I mentioned that I had colored my Crinkle Ribbon with Alcohol Ink.  The trick to using alcohol ink on ribbon is that you have to start with really wet ribbon.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comAlcohol Ink will not wick and spread through ribbon as much as dye inks.  If you place it on dry ribbon it will dry very quickly without spreading creating a spot of color.  When dripped on very wet ribbon it will wick out but not as much as other inks.  Unless you apply enough ink to completely cover the ribbon you will get soft bleeds of color that fade out like shown above.  I really like this look and like being able to keep some areas of the ribbon white.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comWhen you are done applying ink, wring the ribbon out well with a dry cloth.  Dry the ribbon with your heat tool.  Remember, alcohol inks in the bottle are flammable so take extra caution and keep your bottles of ink away from your heat tool.  The ink of the ribbon is safe to heat since the alcohol has been exposed to air and evaporated.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTo add a bit of aging to the ribbon, tap over the ribbon lightly with a brown Distress Ink on an ink blending tool.  I use the ink already on my foam without reinking so that the color will be softer.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comTie the ribbon around the glass votive and add a bow.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comUse a strong quick drying glue to adhere the leaves, stems, and snowflakes to the votive under the bow.

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comThe votive was also colored with Alcohol Ink.  To see how it was created, check out the tutorial I shared on Tim’s blog- Sugar Crackled Glazed Votives.  They are so easy to create using bargain glass votives!

Frosty Winter Votive by Tammy Tutterow | www.rangerink.comI simply adore the way this votive turned out.  It began with a glass votive I picked up in the Dollar Spot at Target this spring and adds in scraps from other projects, and a can from my recycling bin along with ribbon and inks I already had in my crafty stash and vintage pearl stems gifted to me from a friend.

I wish you could see it with a candle glowing inside, it is simply stunning!


tammytutterow2014Tammy Tutterow is the Social Media Manager for Ranger Ink.  She lives near St. Louis, MO.  Tammy is a two time Ranger U graduate.  She is big fan of inky hands and loves writing tutorials online and teaching classes in stores.  You can learn more about Tammy on her blog: Tammy Tutterow- Tutorials for Inky Hands.

CHA 2014 Make-It-Take-It: Tattered Foil Flower

 

1. Die cut Foil Cardstock with the Tattered Florals die in the Vagabond.

2. Punch a hole in the center of each flower with a 1/8", long reach, hole punch or Crop-A-Dile.

3.Working over a Craft Sheet, place a piece of felt onto the Adirondack Alcohol Ink Applicator and apply Alcohol Ink colors to the felt in stripes. (Teakwood, Wild Plum, Poppyfield, Honeycomb, Lettuce, Botanical, Mermaid, Indigo)

4. Place the floral die cut pieces on the Craft Sheet and ink them by repeatedly tapping the inked surface of the felt to the surface of the Foil Cardstock with the Ink Applicator.

5. Let dry or use a personal fan to help the Alcohol Ink evaporate. (NEVER apply heat to wet Alcohol Ink!)

6. Gently curl petals of the flowers to add dimension.

7. Stack flower pieces together, from small to large, lining up the punched holes. Place on Craft Sheet.

8. Accordion fold tulle lengthwise in 1" folds.

9.Put a Tim Holtz® Idea-ology® Long Fastener through the stacked flower pieces (small to large) and through the center of the folded tulle. Holding the tulle on the prongs of the Long Fastener, flair out the tulle so it forms a circle. Place 1 hole of the Tim Holtz® Idea-ology® Hinge clip onto the prongs and fold the prongs out firmly, so they hold the Hinge clip in place.

10. Pinch a Ranger Ink Tool Replacement foam in half and apply a small amount of Alcohol Ink (Mermaid) to the center. Dab the foam onto the Tim Holtz® Idea-ology® Accoutrements Fanciful (stacked flower) button. Let dry.

11. Place a Glue Dot® on the center of the foil flower, over the top of the Long Fastener.

12. Place inked button on Glue Dot® and press firmly. Clip your flower on a lapel and enjoy!